Many of us were taught never to start a sentence with a conjunction - words such as "and," "or," "but." After all, conjunction means a word that joins together sentences, clauses, phrases, or words. However, this often resulted in run-on sentences or short, choppy ones.

It's funny how the rules have changed over the years...and just who decides these rules any way? In the 1700's, it was perfectly acceptable to start sentences with a conjunction. And it's becoming increasingly prevalent now.

There are many advantages to starting a sentence with a conjunction:

  • It creates a conversational style, which is necessary in marketing.
  • It adds emphasis or a punch to your intended meaning.
  • It reduces the need for long, wordy compound sentences.

It is not grammatically incorrect to start a sentence with a conjunction. And in fact, it's fine to start a sentence with one. But not too often. Or you could over do it.

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Susan Regier, owner of Vantage One Writing, is an in-demand copywriter, marketing strategist, and business breakthrough specialist to serious entrepreneurs who want to have a profitable business they are passionate about.  She has the uncanny ability to find the hidden gems in a business that can ignite sales and profits for her clients.  Claim your free guide: 15 Tips to Increase Your Influence, Attract More Clients & Make More Money at https://susanregier.com.